Test prop keep gains

Hi Oscar
Cheers for the reply. The esc came as a combo pack from HK “Afro esc + motor combo by multi star” 10A draw max 120w. so is that 120w/= each x4= draw in total? right? sorry still learning. I know the lipo is around - when full. was not sure if you went with that value.
I went with multi star as I upgraded my Blade 350 QX to the same brand and found no issue with them.
I’ll have a wee look into the Naze32 for an upgrade! I’ll also keep going with the MultiWii just now as its always good to learn new things plus no point in wasting it.

Looking at box stock props, the Trophy is a good but the Pro Max should offer better overall performance and durability. The 8″ jack plate might offer a little better performance when you marry with the right prop. I think the Pro Max, with its tremendous cup wrapped around the blade tips, will give you what you’re looking for with the set back. The Trophy is ″ in diameter. The Pro Max is ″. The props share the same hub size. The Pro Max doesn’t have vent holes nor does it need them. There’s enough exhaust venting over the small hub. The plastic blow out ring fitted over the front of the Trophy would hurt the Pro Max’s planing performance. I think the Pro Max would be a fun prop for your set up.

Tom,
The height increase depends on set-up and prop diameter. The Bravo I XS is a large diameter propeller. Typically, those running it raise the engine 1/2″ higher than the standard transom height. I’ve seen some run their Bravo I XS engines as high as 1″ above the standard height. It all depends on the application and what you want to get out of it. Hole shot – mid-range punch or top-end speed. A hydraulic transom plate enables the operator to experience the full capabilities of the Bravo I XS. Bottom line, you have to try and figure out what works best for your application.

Since Ruby and the introduction of RubyVM::InstructionSequence::load_iseq , we've been able to programmatically load ruby bytecode. By divorcing the process of running YARV byte code from the process of compiling ruby code, we can take advantage of the strengths of the ruby virtual machine while simultaneously reaping the benefits of a compiler such as macros, type checking, and instruction sequence optimizations. This can make our ruby faster and more readable! This talk demonstrates how to integrate this into your own workflows and the exciting possibilities this enables.

The Axiom is the joker in our pack. It is not a folding propeller, but it does have a revolutionary blade profile and section, if you will pardon the pun, and has never been tested on a yacht before, so we just had to put it into our trials to see how it compared. As the photograph shows, the blade profile is rectangular, while the blade section is almost S-shaped, and symmetrical in ahead and astern, with no twist. Its designers claim it gives greater thrust and stopping power, together with lower wash. So how did it stand up? Well the charts show the story, with its stopping time nearly a second better than any other model, and its side thrust again the lowest by far. However this was at the expense of lower top speed, which suggests some more tweaking is needed, but it is still one to watch.

Test prop keep gains

test prop keep gains

Since Ruby and the introduction of RubyVM::InstructionSequence::load_iseq , we've been able to programmatically load ruby bytecode. By divorcing the process of running YARV byte code from the process of compiling ruby code, we can take advantage of the strengths of the ruby virtual machine while simultaneously reaping the benefits of a compiler such as macros, type checking, and instruction sequence optimizations. This can make our ruby faster and more readable! This talk demonstrates how to integrate this into your own workflows and the exciting possibilities this enables.

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